The 2017 Line Up For Mid America Music Festival

July 28th-30th

Ozark Mountain Daredevils

The Ozark Mountain Daredevils are an American Southern rock/country rock band formed in 1972 in Springfield, Missouri, United States. They are most widely known for their singles "If You Wanna Get To Heaven" in 1974 and "Jackie Blue" in 1975. A brand new live album by the Daredevils, a two-disc set featuring 21 tracks, including old favorites, rare songs and a couple of new ones, titled Alive & Wild, was made available in October 2011. This was taken from shows performed at Wildwood Springs Lodge in Steelville, Missouri in November 2010. The band line up for these shows included: John Dillon, Steve Cash, Michael ‘Supe’ Granda, Ron Gremp, Dave Painter, Kelly Brown, Bill Jones, Ruell Chappell (now on percussion and vocals) and Nick Sibley (guitar, mandolin, backing vocals), a former bandmate of Chappell's. Since 2010, the band has continued to make concert appearances with this nine piece line-up.

Jason Boland and the Stragglers

Since coming together in Stillwater, Oklahoma, Boland and his tightknit crew have sold more than half a million albums independently and earned a devoted following that’s swelled far beyond the band’s red dirt roots. At a Stragglers show, oil patch roughnecks, hippies, college kids, and intelligentsia all sway side-by-side like a traveling reincarnation of Austin’s Armadillo World Headquarters in its cosmic cowboy, Willie Nelson heyday.

While the Stragglers draw from rock and folk, make no mistake: they traffic in unfiltered, unfettered honky-tonk, raw and lean. Equal parts subtle, meditative, and snarling, and often wickedly funny, Squelch is a deeply rooted exercise in exhuming beauty by trading smoke and mirrors for what’s real.

Brother Dege & The Brethren

Brother Dege (AKA Dege Legg) is one of the best kept secrets in the Deep South; a musician, writer, workingman and heir to a long line of unusual characters born and raised in the southern U.S. Like the mad lovechild of Son House and Faulkner, Legg has burned a crooked trail to the Promised Land. Avoiding traditional career paths, he has spent as much time exploring the backwoods weirdness of his home state as he has forging his own brand of incendiary, "psyouthern" roots music. The journeys are parallel. Since the late 90s, Dege has pushed slide, resonators, and the deep south, kicking and screaming into the 21st century, melding elements of folk, Delta blues, punk, rock, metal, hippie ragas, and outlaw county into one blasted, raw whole.

Katy Guillen & The Girls

On the dawn of their sophomore album release Heavy Days, Katy Guillen and the Girls have established themselves as an authentic, authoritative rock band. They are known to pack in crowds at blues roadhouses and prominent concert venues alike, supporting major touring acts or headlining festivals and bills of their own. In their short time as a band, the trio has shaped their own musical identity, rooted heavily in the blues but taking cues from the timeless guitar riffs of Jimi Hendrix to the visionary songwriting of Patty Griffin and the indie rock revivalist sound of Heartless Bastards.

The Creek Rocks

“Wolf Hunter” is the debut CD by The Creek Rocks from Springfield, Missouri. The title is an amalgam of the names of the two folklorists whose collections provided the raw materials for the songs on the album -- John Quincy Wolf of Batesville, Arkansas and Max Hunter of Springfield, Missouri. Cindy Woolf was raised in Batesville, along the southern foothills of the Ozarks Mountain region, and Mark Bilyeu hails from Springfield, located atop the Ozarks Plateau. They began their musical collaboration in 2003 with Mark at the helm for Woolf’s debut CD “Simple and Few.” They married each other in 2013, shortly after the release of Cindy’s third solo CD, “May.” Joining them on Wolf Hunter are bassist Jason Chapman, also known from The Chapmans, the award-winning family bluegrass band; and percussionist Jay Williamson, who is a sixteen-year veteran of another family band, Big Smith, of which Mark was a founding member as well. Big Smith released seven CDs during their tenure, and Mark has a solo album to his credit, 2005's "First One Free."

Outlaw Jim and The Whiskey Benders

Outlaw Jim and The Whiskey Benders are a hard-hittin’ Outlaw Country band with roots in the sounds of Waylon Jennings and Merle Haggard, as well as influences from New Orleans Funk and Southern Rock. They have traveled extensively in the Midwest and South, playin’ festivals, concerts, private events, as well as the beloved honky-tonks along the way. They have played The Grand Ole’ Opry Plaza Parties and famous venues on Lower Broadway in Nashville, numerous bars and festivals in New Orleans, and mountain towns in The Rocky Mountains.

In their hometown of Kansas City, Missouri, they have opened for David Allan Coe, Billy Joe Shaver, Sammy Kershaw, Aaron Tippin, John Michael Montgomery, Jason Boland and Stragglers, The Wilders, Rex Hobart & The Misery Boys, Blake Shelton, Josh Gracin, Carolina Rain, and opened Y’allapalooza at Verizon Wireless Amphitheater in 2008.

Ryan Collins

Missouri born and raised, Ryan Collins resides in Nashville but hasn't forgotten his roots. This twenty-six year old Country singer takes his love for music seriously. As a child, Ryan kick started his passion singing and playing guitar in church. From that moment, music has been the only thing on his mind. His reputation precedes him as a very talented musician to this day. Ryan wanted to take the next step in his career by forming a band. He brought together four life long friends to create a magnetic dynamic of talented musicians. Together they form a strong bond which leads to an original sound and energetic stage presence. Well-rounded, passionate, and musically sound, Ryan Collins is a one-of-a-kind artist.

Cory Branan

Throughout his career, Cory Branan has been too punk for country, too country for punk, too Memphis for Nashville, and probably a little too Cory Branan for anyone’s damn good. He has proven himself as a top-notch songwriter (Chuck Ragan recently called him “the greatest songwriter of our generation”), fierce lyricist (in Lucero’s “Tears Don’t Matter Much” they sing that Cory has, “a way with words that’ll bring you to your knees”), and a hyperdynamic performer with the ability to fingerpick finer than ‘60s Greenwich Village folkies and brutally strum like a proto punk shredder. Throughout his career, he’s made collective struggles poetic and breakthroughs into sympathetic acts of populist heroism.

Slow Leak

Slow Leak started as a traditional bluegrass band, pounding out old standards as well as a sprinkling their own material. Now years later, they have transformed into a sound all their own. Their shows are filled with acoustic harmonies, muddy rivers, and honest folk tunes crafted from heartbreak, happiness, and tough times. The band is now comprised of four characters who began playing together at the infamous RP Hill deer camps (Stoney Bowers, mandolin/guitar, Bob Gass, bass, and Travis Mullenix, guitar) along with a Carrollton native, (Sean Cleary, dobro/guitar). Slow Leak’s unique musical style spans decades and genres, and its unpolished purity is reminiscent of down home jams, roadhouse sessions, and simpler times.